8 Tips for Keeping Your House Warm This Winter

Keeping your house warm in winter shouldn’t simply be about having good heating. There are many other ways to make sure your house retains heat and fends off the cold outdoor weather.

As the mercury drops it’s time to think about how to keep yourself warm and cozy indoors when winter arrives. Winter is a great time to enjoy indoor activities and catch up on reading or tackling any craft projects that couldn’t tempt you inside during the summer. Turning your home into a comfy winter refuge can be difficult in houses that are drafty or are not fitted with quality heating appliances.

But there’s no need to freeze this winter. Here are eight tips for keeping your house warm in the wintertime.

 

1) Hang heavy curtains to stop heat from escaping 

Did you know that up to 40% of the heat that escapes from your home leaks from bare, uncovered windows? Considering how much effort and energy is put into heating your rooms, this seems an incredible waste! Hanging heavy, lined (insulated) curtains that extend beyond the window frames will go a long way toward improving the efficiency of your heater by stopping much of the warm air from escaping through the glass. Alternatively, cellular blinds offer the same energy-saving benefits as heavy curtains in winter with the addition of being completely block-out, effectively cutting your air conditioning costs in summer by keeping the warm air outside.

 

2) Invest in energy-efficient glass

It’s true; closing block-out curtains will help maintain the warmth inside your home. But this isn’t the middle ages – nobody should have to live their winter months in darkness to keep warm! 

No matter how well your ceiling and walls are insulated, you still have a huge energy liability in your home if you don’t use good window glass. Ordinary window glass offers no insulation benefits, so in a typical home with insulation in the walls and ceiling, the windows cause the most unwanted heat loss.

To keep your home warm this winter without running your heater 24/7, an investment into energy-efficient window glass will pay itself off over the years when you have far less need for running your heater.

 

How to keep house warm

 

3) Check your insulation

Have you checked your insulation lately? In winter, up to 35% of your home’s warmth is lost through the ceiling. If your home is poorly insulated, you’ll lose over a quarter of your heat output straight up through the roof. A professionally insulated home is faster to heat, uses less energy to keep it cozy throughout those bitter winter nights, and retains heat for longer.

 

4) Seal up gaps and cracks

Here’s a fun fact – if you combine all the gaps and cracks in your home that lead directly outdoors, you’ll have, on average, about a one-meter hole in your house! Imagine how much heat you’re pumping straight out through those gaps. To keep your house warm this winter, head to your local hardware store and stock up on weather stripping, silicone, and caulk, or contact your local handyperson to come out and assess your home. Remember to check:

  • The seals around your windows;
  • Gaps under exterior doors;
  • Cracks in your plasterboard;
  • Gaps between brickwork; and
  • Unsealed skirting boards.

 

5) Heat yourself, not your furniture

Furniture can’t feel the cold, so why are your heating it? Keep the heat where you want it by closing off areas you aren’t using. Not only will you save energy, but you will find that the areas you use will heat up faster and will stay warmer for longer once you turn your heater off – not to mention that you won’t get any cold drafts coming from those unused spaces. 

If you have old or outdated ducted heating, this may be the year to look into updating your heating system this winter. Modern heating systems will allow you to turn off certain rooms or areas to save energy, which will be especially effective in large houses.

 

Tips for Keeping Your House Warm This Winter

 

6) Let in free energy

Keep an eye on the sun. When sunlight enters a room, it is mostly ultraviolet (UV) radiation, which easily passes through glass. These UV rays can go a long way toward heating your home. To help heat your home this winter, follow the sun by opening the blinds and curtains where the sun is shining. Just make sure you don’t forget to close them up again once the sun has moved on!

 

7) Maintain your heaters

A well-maintained heater will keep your house warm more efficiently – that’s why it is essential to keep your vents and filters free of dust and grime. As well as regularly cleaning your fitters, you should also ensure that you have your heater maintained at least every two years to check for issues and keep the system running smoothly. 

 

8) Cover your floors

If you find yourself padding around in bed with socks and slippers all winter long to keep your feet warm, it’s likely because your floors are sucking heat from the room. 

The warmest and most heat-saving floors are carpet and cork. Other flooring options such as laminate tiles and vinyl are likely to pull heat from your rooms, though this depends greatly on the subflooring and insulation installed beneath them (hint: if you’re laying these types of flooring – insulate!).

On the other end of the heat spectrum, ceramic tile, stone, and marble are the biggest cold-inducing culprits. If you have such flooring in your home and want to find ways to keep your house warm this winter, lay down carpets and rugs in high traffic and sitting areas.

9) Use Solar Pannels

There is no doubt that heating your home in winter is vital for your health and wellbeing, but the ongoing cost of a cozy home can take your breath away. Rather than spending money year after year on your power bills, have a chat with the team at Jim’s Energy about investing in solar panels.

solar panel

 

Between the government rebates available and our available payment plans, your solar panel system is easily affordable and could well pay itself off over time. Are you thinking about installing solar panels in your home this year? Call  Jim’s Energy for a free consultation and quote on 13 15 46.